Course Descriptions

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Check the individual semester course schedules for specific courses added for individual semesters, especially Special Topics courses and Weekend and Condensed Courses.

Each course name is followed by the number of credit hours in parentheses.

LOCKSTEP COURSES

Civil Procedure (4)   LAW-7005
A study of the rules and doctrines that define the process of civil litigation in American courts, with primary emphasis on the U.S. Constitution, the federal judicial code, and the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure. The course may cover topics such as the jurisdiction and competence of courts, conflicts between state and federal law, pleading, discovery, joinder of claims and parties, disposition without trial, trial and post-trial process, appellate review, and the effects of judgment.

Constitutional Law (4)   LAW-7010
A study of the provisions in the U.S. Constitution governing the form of government and the powers of the federal judiciary, legislature, and executive; the relations between the federal government and the states; the limitations on governmental power over individuals inherent in constitutional provisions relating to due process and equal protection; and the restrictions on private action mandated or permitted by these constitutional provisions.

Contracts (4)   LAW-7017
A study of the enforceability of promises, the creation of contractual obligations, performance and breach, the impact of the contract on the legal relationships of nonparties, and the examination of contract doctrine in three settings: personal service, sales of goods, and construction contracts.

Criminal Law (4)   LAW-7021
An inquiry into the sources and goals of criminal law, the concepts of actus reus and mens rea, characteristics of specific offenses, inchoate crimes, accomplice liability, and general defenses.

Legal Analysis, Research & Writing I (3)   LAW-7001
Legal Analysis, Research & Writing II (3)   LAW-7002
A study of analysis, research, and writing skills essential to the solution of legal problems and the practice of law. Analytical skills, essential for all of law school and law practice, are covered throughout each course. Students learn the methods of legal research through hands-on library experience. Students will write at least two legal memoranda and a trial brief in the first year.

Legislation & Regulation (3)   LAW-7418
An introduction to the role of statutes and administrative regulations in the practice of law, including their creation, amendment, and interpretation. Students will explore such topics as the interpretive and lawmaking roles of the three branches of government; statutory interpretation; delegation and administrative agency practice; and regulatory governance. The course is a building block for courses in legislation, administrative law, constitutional law, and a wide range of specialized courses that rely on statutory and regulatory law, including bankruptcy, commercial law, environmental law, intellectual property, securities regulation, and tax law.

Property (4)   LAW-7032
An introduction to personal property and real property laws, including estates and future interests in land, landlord-tenant problems, and issues relating to private and public land use.

Torts (4)   LAW-7042
A study of the basic principles of civil liability for harm to persons or property. Topics include intentional torts, negligence, strict liability, defenses, and damages. Additional topics may be included.

ADVANCED REQUIRED COURSES

Business Associations I (3)   LAW-7056
This course studies the basic principles of the varying business entities used to conduct ventures for profit. The course will cover fundamental agency principles, partnerships, limited liability companies, and corporations. We will study how these business organizations are formed, the powers and responsibilities of their respective partners, members, officers or directors, and their shareholder’s rights and liabilities. The course’s primary focus will be the corporation and corporate law; including topics such as pre-incorporation issues; the corporate formation process, and corporate capital and financing. Business entity taxation concepts may be covered as well. The course objective is to give students both foundational and practical knowledge of how business organizations work. This includes learning how to make assessment as to which type of business organization is best suited for a particular client’s objectives, the legal formalities necessary in forming that business organization, and understanding the rights, duties, and obligations for those affiliated with that organization. Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program, including Contracts.

Criminal Procedure (3)   LAW-7065
This course considers issues relating to constitutional constraints on the investigation and prosecution of criminal offenses. Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program.

Evidence (4)   LAW-7080
An examination of the problems of proof, including study of the admission and exclusion of evidence on the basis of relevancy, policy, and protection of the individual or the state; the examination of witnesses; substitutes for evidence; and procedural considerations. Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program, including Civil Procedure.

Professional Responsibility (3)   LAW-7091
A study of the rules regulating the practice of law. Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program.

Wills & Estates (3)   LAW-7076
This course covers the basics of testate and intestate succession, including the following topics: drafting, execution, and construction of attested and holographic wills; testamentary capacity, undue influence, and fraud; revocation of wills; distribution of intestacy; nonprobate transfers of property; and ethical issues that arise during estate planning. There will be a significant focus on Texas law in the coverage of these topics. Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program, including Property.

ADVANCED REQUIRED COURSES: LEGAL ANALYSIS, RESEARCH & WRITING III (LARW III)

Topics vary. Students may fulfill this requirement with any of the listed LARW III classes.

LARW III: Appellate Drafting (2)   LAW-7785
This course hones students’ analytical and persuasion skills through a focus on appellate brief writing and oral advocacy in the appellate court setting. Students will have numerous smaller writing projects during the course, which will culminate in a large brief-writing project due near the end of the semester. Students will also participate in significant oral argument exercises. Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program, including LARW I & II.

LARW III: Business Collections (2)   LAW-7791
Writing and analysis skills for business collection lawsuits; drafting a demand letter, petition, answer, interrogatories, judgment order, application for writ of garnishment and motions for substituted service; default judgment and summary judgment; introduction to negotiation, settlement and trial advocacy skills. Prerequisite: One year in law school in the full-time or part-time program; LARW I and II, and Contracts.

LARW III: Contract Drafting (2)   LAW-7780
This hands-on course covers contemporary commercial drafting of contracts, an essential skill for transactional practice that is also useful for litigators. Topics include translation of a client’s business deal into contract language; the organizational paradigm for a formal contract; drafting definitions, covenants, representations, and warranties; deconstructing and marking up contracts; transactional and formbook research; and proper use of boilerplate provisions. Students will draft at least two major contracts and will have smaller drafting and research assignments throughout the course. Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program, including LARW I & II and Contracts.

LARW III: Criminal Procedure (2)   LAW-7792
Practice of concepts studied in ​Criminal Procedure; draft motions to suppress and habeas corpus petitions challenging timely topics. Prerequisite: One year of law school in full-time or part-time program; ​Criminal Procedure.

LARW III: Drafting for the General Practitioner (2)   LAW-7789
This two-credit practical skills class introduces students to the drafting of legal documents that are common to the general practitioner. The course is designed to provide students with general knowledge of and proficiency with the typical documents lawyers are asked to draft by practicing the drafting techniques common to the various types of legal documents lawyers encounter. The course is based on “small firm” simulations during which students will represent one client in a variety of legal matters including contract drafting, will drafting, negotiation, and settlement of a dispute. In addition to learning new drafting skills, students will hone writing and oral advocacy skills already learned through the production of client letters, lawyer-to-lawyer email communications, and oral settlement negotiations. Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program, including LARW I & II.

LARW III: Estate Administration Drafting (2)   LAW-7787
This course is designed to teach students how to open, conduct, and close an administration of a decedent’s estate under Texas law. Topics include independent and dependent administrations; probate of the decedent’s will; powers, rights, and duties of the personal representative; payment of creditors’ claims; and informal probate procedures. This course will provide a practical look at how to represent a client who is serving as the personal representative of a decedent’s estate or who is a beneficiary of a decedent’s estate. There will be no exam for this course. Students’ grades will be based on various drafting projects assigned throughout the semester. Prerequisites: (1) One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program, including LARW I & II; (2) Wills & Estates.

LARW III: Estate Planning and Drafting (2)   LAW-7779
This course involves working through hypothetical clinical problems, including extensive drafting and working closely with the professor. The problems involve comprehensive planning and drafting of estate planning documents to effectuate the plan. Prerequisites: (1) One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program, including LARW I & II; (2) Wills & Estates; and (3) Trusts & Fiduciary Responsibilities (may be taken concurrently).

LARW III: Family Law Drafting (2)   LAW-7786
This practice skills course covers drafting documents for family law litigation. All aspects of litigation are covered from pretrial to appeal. Students will draft several substantive documents during the course. Prerequisites: (1) One year of law school in the fulltime or part-time program, including LARW I & II; (2) Family Law.

LARW III: How the Deals Get Done (2) or (3)   ​LAW-7790
Transactional law practice using a hypothetical start-up business to help deal with the transactional issues in this context; combination of theory and practice to prepare for typical matters confronted in a transactional law practice. Prerequisites: One year in law school in the full-time or part-time program; LARW I and II; Business Associations I or Business Associations (four credit-hour course offered prior to Fall 2013).

LARW III: Litigation Drafting (2)   LAW-7782
This practical course deals with drafting litigation documents. Using a state trial court forum and the Texas Rules of Civil Procedure, students draft litigation documents that they can expect to prepare in typical litigation cases. Topics covered include conducting client interviews; drafting petitions, answers, and affirmative defenses; propounding written discovery; objecting to and answering written discovery; preparing and arguing motions; and preparing other litigation-related documents. Students will draft a major persuasive motion and will have several smaller drafting and research assignments throughout the course. Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program, including LARW I & II and Civil Procedure.

LARW III: Patent Law Drafting (2)   LAW-7781
This skills-based writing course introduces students to the practice of patent prosecution, which is the process of obtaining a patent from the United States Patent and Trademark Office. The course follows the process from the initial client interview through the issuance of a patent and through post-issuance filings. Writing assignments include a patentability opinion letter, an original patent application, and a response to an Office Action. Some scientific or technical expertise may be helpful, but is not required. Prerequisites: (1) One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program, including LARW I & II; (2) Patent Law.

LARW III: Public Policy Drafting (2)   LAW-7793
Introduction to the various forms of written (and oral) communication encountered in the public policymaking process, particularly in regulated industries; overview of "public policy" and the various communication strategies and skills necessary to participate in the policymaking process. Prerequisites: One year in law school in the full-time or part-time program; LARW I and II.

LARW III: Real Estate Drafting (2)   LAW-7783
This practice skills course covers drafting commonly used real estate documents. The focus is on Texas practice, and both personal and commercial transactions are covered. Students will draft several substantive documents during the course. Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program, including LARW I & II and Property.

LARW III: Trademark Practice (2) or (3)   LAW-7784
This skills-based writing course introduces students to the practice of trademark prosecution, which is the process of registering trademarks with the United States Patent and Trademark Office. Trademark prosecution is a significant aspect of a legal practice in intellectual property, and this course seeks to develop students’ practical, analytical, and counseling skills in this area through a series of contextualized writing assignments. This is a limited enrollment course. No online registration. Prerequisites: (1) One year of law school in the fulltime or part-time program, including LARW I & II; (2) Trademark & Unfair Competition (may be taken concurrently).

CORE CURRICULUM ELECTIVE COURSES

Administrative Law (2) or (3)   LAW-7113
A study of the legal principles and procedures to which an unelected bureaucracy must conform to achieve legitimacy. The course reviews the problems inherent in a relatively disunited body of law derived from disparate sources, but concentrates on the Constitution and other federal law as the primary sources of organizing principles for administrative law and procedure. Topics addressed may include the constitutional underpinnings of the federal bureaucracy, judicial review of agency fact finding and legal interpretation, extra-statutory administrative common law, the grounds for dividing administrative actions into adjudication and rule making, the essential components of due process in agency adjudication, and the availability of judicial review of agency action. Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program.

Advanced Torts (3)   LAW-7104
Building on the material covered in Torts, this course examines various topics in the law of torts such as products liability, defamation, invasion of privacy, and business torts, including misrepresentation and interference with contractual relations. Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program, including Torts.

Agency & Partnership (2)   LAW-7122
A study of the common law of principal and agent, and the law of unincorporated business entities, including general and limited partnerships and limited liability companies. Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program.

Consumer Law (2)   LAW-7195
A study of the current state of the law as it applies to consumer transactions. Topics include debt collection practices, credit disclosure and regulation, product liability, the Texas Deceptive Trade Practices Act, the work of the Federal Trade Commission, truth in lending laws, and fair credit laws. Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program, including Torts and Contracts.

Family Law (3)   LAW-7301
A study of legal problems related to the establishment, dissolution, reorganization, and evolving definitions of the family and family-like relationships in America, including premarital arrangements, marriage (formal and informal), divorce, parent-child relationship, division of marital property, spousal and child support, domestic violence within the family, and same-sex unions. Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program.

Federal Income Taxation (3)   LAW-7319
A study of the basic principles of federal income tax, concentrating upon individual taxpayers, business taxpayers, and investors as taxpayers. Particular emphasis is placed on the use of the Internal Revenue Code and federal tax regulations. Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program.

Marital Property (3)   LAW-7428
A study of the property rights of husband and wife under the Texas community property system, including coverage of the law relating to homestead. Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program. May be offered as a distance education course. Prerequisite: 28 completed hours.

Oil & Gas (3)   LAW-7444
A study of oil and gas law with emphasis upon the interests that may be created in oil and gas, the transfer and conveyance of such interests, rights of operators and landowners, provisions in the oil and gas lease, the rights of assignees, and regulations dealing with exploration, production, and conservation. Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program, including Property.

Payment Systems (3)   LAW-7454
This course explores commercial paper, bank deposits, and collections under UCC Articles 3 and 4. Topics covered include negotiability and the rights and obligations of parties to commercial paper, defenses to liability, relationship of banks and customers, check collection, and suretyship. Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program, including Torts and Contracts.

Remedies (3)   LAW-7484
A review of the forms of legal and equitable relief a court is equipped to grant by way of redress to those who have been or may be injured, including alternative choices and the tactical advantages of each. The course may also discuss the scope of judges’ powers of contempt. Prerequisite: 56 completed hours.

Sales & Leases (2) or (3)   LAW-7557
A study of the sale and lease of goods and the principal commercial law governing such transactions. Law dealt with in the course includes Articles 2 and 2A of the Uniform Commercial Code as well as the United Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods. Covered topics include sale and lease contract formation, establishment of express and implied contract terms, creation and disclaimer of warranties, risk of loss, and remedies for breach. Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program, including Contracts.

Secured Transactions (3)   LAW-7488
A study of personal and commercial financing by loans and credit sales under agreements creating security interests in the debtors’ personal property (Article 9 of the UCC and relevant provisions of the Bankruptcy Code).Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program, including Contracts and Property.

Texas Criminal Procedure (3)   LAW-7532
A study of laws regulating Texas’ criminal process, arrest to post-conviction review, emphasizing its unique characteristics. Prerequisites: (1) One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program; (2) Criminal Procedure.

Texas Pretrial Procedure (3)   LAW-7540
A study of Texas law in civil cases pertaining to processes before trial, including jurisdiction, venue, initiating legal proceedings, obtaining factual information from parties and nonparties, and terminating litigation prior to trial. Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program, including Civil Procedure.

Texas Real Property (3)   LAW-7533
This course examines Texas real property law through Texas case law and the Texas statutory law. Topics include conveyances of real property (including contracts and deeds), liens, adverse possession, and servitudes (i.e., easements, real covenants, and equitable servitudes). Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program, including Property.

Texas Trials & Appeals (3)   LAW-7548
A study of Texas law in civil cases pertaining to trial and appellate procedure concerning the jury, presentation of the case, motions for instructed verdict, the court’s charge, the verdict, trial before the court, post-trial motions and procedures, final and appealable judgments, appellate jurisdiction, perfection of appeal, the courts of appeal, the Supreme Court of Texas, and original proceedings in appellate courts. Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program, including Civil Procedure.

Trusts and Fiduciary Responsibilities (2)   LAW-7174
A comprehensive study of the law of trusts, including creation, administration, amendment, and termination of trusts; powers, rights and duties of settlors, trustees and beneficiaries; fiduciary duties and liability of trustees; and creditors’ rights. Emphasis is on Texas law. Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program, including Property.

GENERAL CURRICULUM ELECTIVE COURSES

Accounting for Lawyers (2)   LAW-7108
This course provides students with a fundamental understanding of accounting principles, highlights the importance of accounting issues to the practice of law, and introduces critical techniques of financial analysis, including time value of money, leverage, return metrics, and business valuation. No prior training in finance or accounting is needed. Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program.

Adoption Law (2)   LAW-7114
This course covers many aspects of adoption law, including consent of birthparents, termination of parental rights, Indian Child Welfare Act, transracial and transcultural adoption, international adoption, access to information, the effects of adoption, and actions for wrongful adoption. Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program.

ADR Survey: Negotiation, Mediation & Arbitration (3)   LAW-7222S
This course will serve as an introduction to the main three tools of Alternative Dispute Resolution: negotiation, mediation, and arbitration. (Negotiation is when two or more parties work together to achieve a mutually acceptable agreement; mediation is when a neutral third party plays the role of mediator in assisting by asking questions and guiding the conversation of two or more parties as they work together to achieve a mutually acceptable agreement; and arbitration is when a neutral third party takes on the role of judge and decides the outcome of a disputed matter after it is presented to him or her in a setting similar to a court trial.) Through the use of lecture, simulations, and exercises, students will learn both theoretical and practical aspects of all three tools. Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program.

Advanced Issues in Criminal Justice (2) or (3)   LAW-7204
Critical analysis of processes, other than trials, used in the U.S. criminal justice system to resolve criminal cases; includes plea bargaining, therapeutic justice, restorative justice and juvenile justice; examines the policy goals supporting continuing, starting or expanding the use of these processes to resolve criminal cases. Prerequisite: All lockstep courses except Constitutional Law and Criminal Procedure.

Agricultural Law (2) or (3)   LAW-7303
Study of major areas of agricultural law; practical approach including discussions and hands-on assignments; legal issues relating to animal agriculture, food safety, landowner rights, the interaction between agriculture and energy production, agricultural leases, agricultural policy and estate and succession planning for farm families. Prerequisite: One year of law school in full-time or part-time program.

Animal Law (2)   LAW-7604
This course provides an overview of the changing relationship between society and animals by examining the development of both civil and criminal law as it relates to animals. The course also explores the philosophical issues that drive the law’s evolution and describes the law as an expression of how we share the environment with animals. Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program.

Art of Lawyering (3)   LAW-7112
The Art of Lawyering is designed to help students develop and hone the analytic and problem-solving skills that are required for optimal success in law school, the bar exam, and in the practice of law. To enhance their abilities to bring together the law they are learning in a useful manner, students will undertake several practical assignments individually and in small groups for which they will receive detailed feedback. Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program.

Bankruptcy (3)   LAW-7145
A study of the law relating to individual and business liquidations and reorganizations under the Bankruptcy Code. Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program, including Contracts and Property.

Business Associations II (3)   LAW-7057
This course is designed for students who have a particular interest in corporate law and builds upon the basic concepts learned in Business Associations I. This course will focus on the rules and legal principles that govern large corporations and their constituents and is especially recommended to students who are interested in representing public corporations in private practice. Topics to be covered include: mergers and acquisitions, the issuance of corporate debt, executive compensation, the proxy solicitation process, shareholder proposals and other mechanisms of shareholder democracy. The course will also cover indemnification of officers and directors, corporate charitable giving and political speech, and the role of Special Litigation Committees in derivative suits. The course will also address securities law-related issues such as securities fraud, insider trading, and ethical issues in the representation of public corporations. Prerequisites: (1) One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program, including Contracts; (2) Business Associations I or Business Associations (four credit-hour course offered prior to fall 2013).

Business Fundamentals for Lawyers (1) or (2)   LAW-7552
Introduction to business concepts and processes important to law practice; covers areas critical to business lawyers, such as financial statements, business strategy, supply chains, HR management, finance, and marketing operations; includes business problem simulations. Prerequisites: One year in law school in the full-time or part-time program.

The Business Negotiator (3)   LAW-7383S
This course provides students the opportunity to develop and strengthen their negotiation skills mostly in the context of business and transactions work. Through lectures, role-plays, and simulations, students will refine their negotiation strategies and techniques in negotiating deals, contracts, and relationships. While the vast majority of the course will focus on improving student ability to engage in transactions work within the United States, the course will also consider various barriers to deal making in a global context, including culture, ideology, and foreign governments and laws. Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program.

Children & the Law (2) or (3)   LAW-7154
This course studies the three-sided relationship between children, their parents (or other conservators), and the state. It examines the many complex problems inherent in the questions of when a state should, must, or should not interfere in the parent-child relationship. It tries to define what that relationship includes and looks at the ways that relationship is evolving in the United States today. The course examines the parent-child relationship through the many forms of Suits Affecting the Parent-Child Relationship (SAPCR), which are common to most states today in their statutes/codes. It does not include any questions of tort liability of parents to or for their children. Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program.

Civil Evidence Workshop (1)   LAW-7891S
This skills practicum focuses on practical subjects related to courtroom evidence. The workshop provides instruction, demonstration, and practice in offering common forms of evidence in civil and criminal trials; common objections and responses to courtroom evidence; depositions, statements, and sworn testimony; and preserving the record and offers of proof. This workshop is open to all students and is recommended for all law students interested in law school mock trial competition or careers in trial advocacy. Prerequisites: (1) One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program; (2) Evidence (may be taken concurrently).

Civil Motion Workshop (1)   LAW-7888S
This class will focus not on civil trials (which are becoming increasingly rare) but on civil motion practice (which is still a very active component of a trial lawyer’s work). Students will be provided with written motions and responses that were filed in actual nonactive lawsuits. Students will then prepare to argue the motions and responses. At each session, students will be called on to argue either the response or the motion, within appropriate time constraints, in front of a sitting district court judge in Tarrant County. Afterwards each student will receive critique and feedback from fellow students and the professor. Students will be exposed, and must quickly understand, the law related to each motion. However, the focus of this course will be on oral argument skills and developing a level of comfort arguing motions in an actual classroom. Prerequisites: (1) One year of law school in the fulltime or part-time program; (2) Civil Procedure (may be taken concurrently).

Civil Rights Litigation (3)   LAW-7162
This course provides an overview of federal legislation designed to provide private actions to enforce constitutional rights, including the kinds of relief available and limits on recovery. Prerequisites: (1) One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program; (2) Constitutional Law (may be taken concurrently).

Construction Law (2)   LAW-7188
This course is intended for students interested in acquiring a practice-oriented knowledge of construction law, legal relationships and causes of action between owners, contractors, subcontractors, engineers, architects, and their insurers, and construction contracts. The course will emphasize the practical aspects of construction practice, requiring that students adopt the roles of attorneys representing various players in reenactment of real construction dispute cases. Prerequisites: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program, including Contracts.

Copyrights (3)   LAW-7203
A study of federal and international laws protecting the innovative endeavors of authors. Topics include the history of copyright law, fair use of copyrighted materials, what can be copyrighted, and the interaction of copyright law with other concepts of unfair competition and intellectual property. Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program.

Courthouse Perspectives (1)   LAW-7890
This course will provide students with a practical, hands-on study of various courts in the Tarrant County area, including the Court of Appeals, District Courts (civil, criminal, and family), County Courts (civil, criminal, and probate), and Justice of the Peace Courts. Students will learn about the function, jurisdiction, and personnel of each court. Each day will begin with a lecture at the Court of Appeals by Justice McCoy, which will be followed by visits to the various courts. During the various visits, students will be introduced to judges, court coordinators, and court reporters. If possible, students will be allowed to observe proceedings in each court they visit. This course will also stress proper courtroom etiquette and nuts-and-bolts procedural training on topics such as how to actually file a document with a court. Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program.

Criminal Procedure Trial Rights (3)   LAW-7313
This course deals with constitutionally mandated judicial processes for determining the guilt or innocence of those accused of crime and for selecting an appropriate penalty. Topics may include bail and pretrial detention, the prosecutor’s charging decision, pretrial publicity, the defendant’s competency to stand trial, jury selection, trial by jury, the defendant’s right of confrontation and compulsory process, the right to effective assistance of counsel, sentencing, direct attacks on criminal convictions, and double jeopardy. Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program.

Criminal Prosecution Clinic (3)   LAW-7863S
This clinic will (1) educate and train students on the law, legal ethics, and skills involved in state criminal prosecutions and (2) expose students to the unique duties and responsibilities of criminal prosecutors as both advocates and ministers of justice. Students will complete a biweekly classroom component taught by adjunct professors who work in the Tarrant County district attorney’s office. These sessions will cover substantive, procedural, and ethics-related law relevant to the daily work of prosecutors, as well as lawyering skills employed by prosecutors. In addition, students will be required to complete at least 180 hours of supervised fieldwork during the semester in the Tarrant County district attorney’s office. Prerequisites: (1) Completion of at least 45 credit hours; (2) Evidence; and (3) either Texas Criminal Procedure or Texas Criminal Law Practicum (may be taken concurrently).

Deposition Skills Workshop (1)   LAW-7887S
This course gives students the opportunity to learn the art of deposition practice and the strategy behind taking depositions. Students will learn and practice fundamental depositions skills; rules pertaining to depositions in federal and state court; how to properly notice a deposition; and how to depose parties, fact witnesses, and experts. The course will conclude with a final deposition performance class in which each student will be provided the opportunity to take and defend a deposition. Enrollment limited to 16. Prerequisite: One year of law school in the fulltime or part-time program, including Civil Procedure

Due Diligence for the Professional (1)    LAW-7304
Practical skills in performing due diligence in business and financial transactions; analyze documents such as financial statements to uncover red flags for fraud; receive a certification from the International Organization of Due Diligence. Prerequisites: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program.

Education Law (2) or (3)   LAW-7227
This course will explore the dynamics of the legal rights, responsibilities and relationships between parents, students, teachers and administrators. It is essential to understand the balance between these rights and the smooth, efficient operation of schools. Topics to be explored include the separation of church and state; the instructional program and the balance between the substantive rights of parents and the compelling interest of the state in educating children, student on-campus First Amendment expression rights, student privacy rights and the application of the Fourth Amendment, rights of students with disabilities, common law student rights, and teacher certification requirements and contractual issues arising from employment relationships. Prerequisites: One year in law school in the full-time or part-time program; (2) Constitutional Law (may be taken concurrently).

Elder Law (2)   LAW-7588
This course presents an overview of the law relating to aging individuals and an older American society, including employment and disability discrimination, retirement, property management, guardianship and protection, health care financing, health care decision-making, housing, and family issues unique to grandparents. When possible, Texas law on particular subjects will also be covered. Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program.

Employment Discrimination (3)   LAW-7248
An in-depth examination of the federal law concerning discrimination in employment on the basis of race, sex, religion, national origin, age, and disability. Topics covered include Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, the Reconstruction Era Civil Rights Act, the Equal Pay Act, the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program.

Employment Law (3)   LAW-7260
A study of the law of employer-employee relations in a nonunion context. Students examine issues such as employment at will, retaliatory discharge, and wage and hour laws. The class introduces students to laws relating to the employment relationship. Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program.

Employment Mediation Clinic (2)   LAW-7862S
This course provides students who have already received basic mediation training with opportunities to co-mediate workplace disputes that arise at the Federal Aviation Administration or other agencies. Each student will be required to co-mediate three to five disputes, with the assistance of an experienced and trained mediator, during the course of the semester. Before each mediation, students will review available background documents, meet with their co-mediator, and prepare for the mediation. At the conclusion of each mediation, students will draft a memorandum to the file describing the outcome of the mediation. Students will also keep a journal and participate in classroom sessions to reflect on their experiences. Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program. Prior academic or professional exposure to mediation and/ or employment law is preferred but not required.

Energy Law (3)   LAW-7408
This course provides an introduction to energy law and regulation in the United States. It focuses on the basic principles of public utility regulation, the division of jurisdiction between federal and state governments, and the key regulatory statutes and case law governing energy resources such as water, coal, oil, natural gas, nuclear and renewable energy. We will analyze the environmental, regulatory, land use, and economic concerns as they relate to each energy source. Finally, this course will provide an introduction to electricity and electric power competition in the United States. Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program.

Entertainment Law (2)   LAW-7268
An examination of basic legal concepts that govern transactions in the entertainment industry, including the constitutional protections of entertainment speech, the rights of individuals who restrict it, copyright fundamentals, contract issues peculiar to the field, and prevailing standards and practices of “the Business.” Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program, including Contracts.

Entrepreneurship Law Clinic (2) or (3)   LAW-7867
Work with entrepreneurs on transactional matters in connection with the founding and/or development of a small business; emphasis on legal issues involved in starting a business including choice of entity, entity formation and founding agreements. May be taken three times for credit. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: One year in law school in the full-time or part-time program; Business Associations I.

Environmental Law (3)   LAW-7277
A study of various approaches for dealing with adverse environmental effects, including private litigation, regulation, and financial incentives. The course surveys air and water pollution, solid and hazardous waste problems, and the National Environmental Policy Act. Attention is also paid to judicial review of legislative and administrative action, the special problems raised by our federal form of government, and the administrative regulatory process in pollution control. Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program, including Property.

Environmental Oil and Gas Law (2)   LAW-7445
Exploration of federal, state, and local environmental laws that impact the oil and gas industry; current laws that apply to hydraulic fracturing activities as well as current studies and enforcement actions concerning the same; and analyzes typical claims and defenses asserted in recent hydraulic fracturing litigation. Prerequisites: One year of law school in the full-time or part time program; Oil and Gas.

Estate & Gift Tax (2) or (3)   LAW-7290
A study of income, gift, estate, and generation-skipping transfer taxes relevant to the estate planning process. Planning and drafting principles for complex estate planning are introduced. Prerequisites: (1) One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program; (2) Wills & Estates (may be taken concurrently).

Ethics for the Criminal Law Practitioner (1-2)   LAW-7120
Students will study the unique ethical and moral dilemmas that arise in the criminal law setting from the perspective of both defense counsel and a prosecutor. The course is intended to help fill the gap between the traditional substantive professional responsibility course and the application of the standards in the practice of criminal law. To accomplish this, the course will take a problem solving approach to the subject. Prerequisites: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program, including Criminal Law.

Externship (1-12)   LAW-7835 / LAW-7836 / LAW-7837 / LAW-7838 / LAW-7839
This course is designed to provide students with learning opportunities, through placements in approved legal settings, in which students may 1) increase understanding of the range of skills necessary for effective lawyering; 2) improve abilities to perform lawyering skills (e.g., applying an area of law to an actual case); 3) begin to identify and reflect upon the strengths and weaknesses as a practicing student attorney; 4) develop productive working relationships with supervisors, clients, support staff, and peers; and 5) reflect on placement experiences through journals and class discussions. Placements can be in either courts, public interest organizations, corporate or government offices, or law firms. Students can earn 1, 2 or 3 pass/ fail credit hours for every 60, 120 or 180 hours of fieldwork completed, respectively. Students will keep timesheets and journals that must be submitted every two weeks. In addition, students must complete a classroom component the first time they register for an externship. The classroom component consists of in-class meetings and online discussions. Online discussions will consist of students responding to topics posted by the professor and responding to fellow student postings. Some minor outside reading and/or activity may be required. Prerequisite: Approval of professor.

Family Law and Benefits Clinic (2) or (3)   LAW-7865S
The Family Law and Benefits Clinic is both a credit course and a functioning law office, allowing students to practice law while in law school. Students represent indigent clients in court under direct faculty supervision. A classroom component meets twice weekly to study the substantive law, to learn essential practical skills, and to discuss client cases. Prerequisite: Approval of professor.

Family Mediation Clinic (3)   LAW-7850S
Students learn mediation skills through lecture and role-play, and attend some classes in the courtrooms of two family judges. Students observe and mediate real family disputes at local mediation centers. An exam and a mediation journal are used in grading this pass/ fail course. A family mediation certificate is given on completion of this course and the Mediation Clinic. Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program.

Federal Courts (3)   LAW-7302
A study of the constitutional and practical doctrines that define the judicial power of the United States, with particular emphasis on the role of federal courts in the American system of government, including the federal courts’ relationship to the other branches of the federal government and their relationship to the separate state systems of government. The course will cover topics such as the constitutional cases and controversies requirement, congressional control of the federal courts, Supreme Court review of state court decisions, the power of the federal courts to create federal law, abstention, suits against state governments, and the enforcement of federal rights. Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program, including Civil Procedure.

First Amendment (3)   LAW-7316
A study of the U.S. Constitution’s First Amendment. The course addresses the First Amendment’s effect on government attempts to regulate content of speech and to restrict speech by regulating one’s method of speaking. Also included is the right of free speech in various physical settings. In addition, the freedoms of assembly and press, free exercise of religion, and the prohibition on governmental establishment of religion will be studied. Prerequisites: (1) One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program; (2) Constitutional Law.

Government Contracts (2)   LAW-7317
Examination of federal government contract law; includes contract formation issues, appropriations requirements, contract types, simplified, sealed bid and negotiated procurement methods, competition requirements, contract pricing, protests of awards, contract administration issues and changes, terminations, claims and litigation in federal forums, government fraud remedies and contractor debarments.

Health Law (3)   LAW-7318
This course focuses on key concepts in health law such as the structure of health care organizations, quality of health care, and liability of health care providers. It also addresses access to health care; financing mechanisms of health care, including Medicare and Medicaid; regulation of health care; and oversight of managed health care. New developments in health care law concerning reproduction, bioethics, and human genetics are also examined. Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program, including Torts.

Healthcare, Technology, and the Law (2) or (3)   LAW-7320
Introduction to legal issues that healthcare businesses encounter when using technology to enhance the patient-physician experience; examination of the regulation of patient privacy and security, medical software and mobile applications, electronic medical records, robotic surgery, fraud and abuse, corporate practice of medicine and use of the Internet to deliver medicine across state lines. Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program.

Immigration Law (2) or (3)   LAW-7332
This course covers basic immigration statutes, including cases and doctrines that control immigration and naturalization. The course also explores the treatment of undocumented immigrants and those seeking protection from persecution. Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program.

Independent Study (1)   LAW-7816
An opportunity for students to do specialized reading or research in an area of interest to the student under a full-time faculty member’s supervision. Prerequisite: All lockstep courses.

Innocence Clinic (2) or (3)   LAW-7869
Investigation of claims of actual innocence on behalf of Texas inmates; document/transcript review; examining new evidence and locating and re-interviewing witnesses; work closely with innocence Project of Texas attorneys if cases move into litigation; weekly classroom component explores causes and cures of wrongful convictions. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: One year of law school in full-time or part-time program.

Insurance Law (2)   LAW-7440
A study of fundamental legal principles relating to the construction of various types of liability and first-party insurance contracts. Topics include insurance regulation, application for coverage and acceptance of risk, and the rules of construction, bad faith, and insurance litigation strategy. Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program, including Torts and Contracts.

Intellectual Property (3)   LAW-7350
An overview of the basic principles of intellectual property law, including coverage of trade secret, trademark, patent, and copyright fundamentals. Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program. May be offered as a distance education course. Prerequisite: 28 completed hours.

Intellectual Property and Technology Clinic (2) or (3)   LAW-7868S
Emphasis on general trademark and patent issues; includes counseling clients, conducting registerability or patentability searches and preparing trademark or patentability opinions for clinic clients, drafting and filing of trademark or patent applications and response to Office Actions. Prerequisites: One year of law school in full-time or part-time program; Intellectual Property or Trademark and Unfair Competition Law or concurrent enrollment.

International Business Transactions (2) or (3)   LAW-7371
This course examines the legal issues encountered in private international business transactions through international trade, exploitation of intellectual property rights and direct foreign investment. Topics covered generally include the international sale of goods; bills of lading; letters of credit; government regulation of imports and exports; technology transfer and intellectual property protection; cross border taxation; forms of agreements, industrial works contracts, employment laws; forms and regulation of foreign direct investment; international corruption and the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. The course will also examine how customary international law, treaties and free trade agreements play a role in these transactions. Prerequisites: (1) One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program, including Contracts; (2) Business Associations I or Business Associations (four credit-hour course offered prior to fall 2013).

International ​Intellectual Property (2) or (3)   LAW-73​51
This course presents a study of the international fabric of patent, copyright, and trademark law under both domestic laws and international treaties. Students will examine the foundation of international intellectual property policies underlying medicinal herbs, counterfeit goods, genetic material, and traditional knowledge. The flow of information and content across borders has placed heightened tension on international intellectual property law and has resulted in increased pressure to harmonize diverse legal frameworks.

International Litigation (2) or (3)   LAW-7368
A study of disputes touching more than one jurisdiction, including selecting the proper forum, discovery, parallel law suits, choice of law, sovereign immunity, the recognition and enforcement of foreign judgments, and arbitration. Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program, including Civil Procedure.

Internet Law (3)   LAW-7223
This course focuses on the transference (or lack of transference) of bricks-and-mortar legal principles to new methods of communication. It looks at recent developments in cyberspace law and provides a survey of legal issues on the internet, including both policy and pragmatic application of jurisdictional principles, intellectual property laws, privacy rights, computer crime, proprietary information, and freedom of speech issues, as well as a full-scale analysis and explication of the question, “Is Google really God?” Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program.

Juvenile Justice (2) or (3)   LAW-7383
A review of the juvenile’s substantive and procedural rights. Prerequisites: (1) One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program; (2) Criminal Procedure.

Labor Law (3)   LAW-7389
A study of the National Labor Relations Act and its implementation. Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program.

Labor Negotiations Workshop (1)   LAW-7390S
Students will learn the process of contract negotiations in the labor setting in both the private and public sectors. Topics covered will include who has the right to bargain contracts, what can be bargained, bargaining in good faith and legal remedies. Bargaining techniques including data-driven proposals will be discussed. Students will be involved in labor bargaining simulations. Prerequisites: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program, including Contracts.

Land Use (3)   LAW-7401
A study of private and public means of controlling land use. Emphasis is placed on the areas of planning and zoning, including the emerging problem of exclusionary land use controls. Further discussion topics include subdivision controls, restrictive deed covenants, eminent domain proceedings, and urban renewal. Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program, including Property.

Law Practice Management (2)   LAW-7412
A review of the professional, ethical, and management requirements for starting and operating a law practice. The course will review the statutory and regulatory aspects of practice, including labor and employment, partnerships and professional corporations, trust and IOLTA accounts, advertising, and solicitations. The course will also review management skills and technology related to time, billing, accounting, docketing, legal research, document preparation, filing, and client development. Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program.

Legislation (2) or (3)   LAW-7416
A study of the state and federal legislative systems examining (1) the relationship between the legislative, executive, and judicial processes; (2) the philosophies of legislative operations and judicial interpretation; (3) statutory and constitutional issues involved in interpreting and applying legislation; and (4) the principles of drafting legislation. The course includes tracking actual legislative sessions, introduced bills, the activity of a student-selected member of choice in the Texas Legislature, and getting practical experience through conducting a mock session of the Legislature to include committee activity, floor debate, voting, and post-legislative activities by means of four extracurricular volunteer Saturday class meetings. Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program.

Mediation Clinic (3)   LAW-7881S
This course follows the standards for mediation training promulgated by the Texas Mediation Trainers Roundtable. To pass the course and receive credit, the student must attend the entire 40 hours of classroom training and participate in the role-plays, performing as a mediator and as a disputant. The student must also satisfactorily complete the clinic portion of the training, which consists of mediations or observations at Dispute Resolution Centers and other locations. In addition, students must submit a journal for each case mediated or observed. Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program.

Mergers and Acquisitions (2) or (3)   LAW-7435
Examination of legal issues related to corporate mergers and acquisitions; mechanics and structure of merger and acquisition transactions, shareholder rights, fiduciary duties, federal securities laws, accounting and tax issues, anti-takeover defenses and antitrust considerations.

National Security Law (3)   LAW-7437
An examination of an emerging branch of legal inquiry that addresses threats to the autonomy of American nationhood. The sources of this law are not unified, ranging from early landmark cases in the Supreme Court to statutes, executive orders, and “practices.” The basic theme of the course is the counterbalancing of legal protection from genuine threats to our national life and the need to preserve our fundamental rights under the rule of law. Prerequisite: All lockstep courses.

Natural Resource Law (2) or (3)   LAW-7438
National Forest Management Act, the Clean Water Act, natural resource conservation acts, Wild and Scenic Rivers Act, the National Environmental Policy Act, and other acts and issues relating to the use, management, and preservation of natural resources.

Nonprofit Organizations (2) or (3)   LAW-7310
This course focuses on the laws, policies, and ideals affecting the creation, operation, and governance of nonprofit organizations, such as hospitals, universities, churches, social service charities, cultural institutions, advocacy groups, trade associations, and social clubs. Nonprofit organizations’ role in society raises complex issues that involve a variety of legal fields, including constitutional law, trust and property law, corporate law, and tax law. Topics include obtaining tax-exempt status, restrictions on lobbying and political activity, tax on unrelated business income, eligibility for charitable contributions, state regulation of charitable solicitations, oversight of nonprofit governance, and charitable immunity. Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program, including Torts and Contracts.

Patent Law (2) or (3)   LAW-7452
The study of how proprietary interests in technology are protected by patent law, with a focus on issues relating to validity, the nature of the subject matter protected, and enforcement of proprietary rights. Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program.

Patent Litigation (2)   LAW-7131
This is a two-credit course covering patent litigation, or the art of protecting patent claims from infringement. The course will give you a sense of how the patent system works and will emphasize the big issues that you are most likely to encounter in practice, whether you become a patent agent, a patent litigator, a business attorney, or just an all purpose country lawyer (yes, you may well come across patent issues in that context in this day and age). The course will also integrate materials from the America Invents Act, the new patent law that will be fully effective as of 2013. Prerequisites: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program.

Post-Conviction Actual Innocence Claims (2)   LAW-7217
This course will teach the law and the practical applications of the law in petitioning the judiciary for relief, based on facts garnered through an initial post-conviction investigation. Students will learn what a post-conviction claim of actual innocence is and how the United States Supreme Court and the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals have analyzed and dealt with such claims in both death penalty and nondeath cases. Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program, including Criminal Law.

Preparing for the Bar Exam (3)   LAW-7458
This 3-credit hour class is pass/fail, with an exam on the last day of class. Only students who are in their last semester of law school may enroll. The class familiarizes students with the contents of the bar exam and seeks to impart the critical skills and strategies necessary for success on each day of the exam. The class covers selections from several MBE and essay-tested subjects. Students will complete several diagnostic tests that simulate portions of the bar exam and will receive feedback on their performance. Evaluation will be based on homework (the diagnostic tests) and a short exam. The course is not intended as a substitute for a commercial bar review course; students should also take a commercial bar review course.

Pre-Suit Patent Litigation (1) or (2)   LAW-7402
Exploration of issues patent litigators should consider prior to filing a complaint for patent infringement; includes the market for patent enforcement; substantive assessment of cases; valuation of cases and economics of patent litigation; best practices for patent case assessment and pre-litigation ethical considerations; complaint drafting. Prerequisites: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program; Patent Law, Patent Litigation, or Intellectual Property.

Pretrial Motion Workshop (1)   LAW-7892S
Students will learn about and draft three pre-trial motions: Motion to Transfer Venue; Motion to Compel Discovery; and Special Appearance 120a. Students will then argue the motions in class. Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program, including Civil Procedure (may be taken concurrently).

Public International Law (3)   LAW-7369
An introduction to the key concepts and doctrines of international law, including topics such as the sources and evidence of international law, the bases of international jurisdiction, the law governing the use of force and the protection of human rights, the law of treaties, and state succession. Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program.

Real Estate Financing (3)   LAW-7477
Exploration of the basic elements involving real estate financing; understanding of the legal framework and practical considerations affecting real estate finance transactions; secured lending, mortgage law, installment land contracts, foreclosures, lien priorities, title insurance and practical issues when representing a lender or borrower on commercial or single family transactions; commercial leasing, ground leases and real estate development.

Scientific Criminal Evidence Workshop (1)   LAW-7889S
Students in this class will learn the theory and practice of using scientific evidence in criminal trials. Specific topics to be covered may include the value and use of DNA, mental health, polygraph, and autopsy evidence. Particular attention will be paid to understanding, preparing for, and conducting “Daubert hearings,” which involve challenges to the admissibility of scientific expert testimony. The format of the class will include lecture by the professor and guest speakers, as well as simulations involving students who will be required to assume the roles of both prosecutors and defense lawyers. Prerequisites: (1) One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program; (2) Evidence (may be taken concurrently).

Securities Law Enforcement (2)   LAW-7493
Exploration of the SEC's enforcement of federal securities laws and related efforts by FINRA and the DOJ; introduction to how the SEC enforces federal securities laws; aspects of the enforcement process; investigative techniques; the Wells process; SEC's litigation efforts in both federal courts and administrative proceedings. Prerequisites: One year of law school in full-time or part-time program; Business Associations I.

Securities Regulation (3)   LAW-7492
A review of federal and state regulation of the public distribution, offer, and sale of corporate securities. The course includes a study of the Securities Act of 1933 and portions of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. Types of securities and underwriting techniques are surveyed, and the key definitions and exemptions in the statutes are studied. State securities law is also studied with emphasis on the securities registration and anti-fraud aspects of the Texas Securities Act. Prerequisites: (1) One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program; (2) Business Associations I or Business Associations (4 credit-hour course offered prior to fall 2013).

Special Problems in Corporate Law:  Cayman Islands (3)   LAW-7409
Combined classroom and field experience in the Cayman Islands: examination of international business, tax strategies, and related policy issues; goals motivating U.S. corporations to organize offshore business entities and policy and legal issues related to the use of such entities; interaction with professionals and policymakers from the Cayman Islands. Prerequisites: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program; Business Associations II, International Business Transactions, Taxation of Business Entities, or concurrent enrollment.

Sp​ecial Topics (​1-4)   LAW-7​900
Special topics in identified areas of law. May be repeated for credit.

Sports Law (3)   LAW-7500S
A thorough look at both the academic (e.g., labor and antitrust) and practical (e.g., contracts and agents) aspects of professional sports and the emerging field of sports law, including rules governing Olympic competition, the NCAA, and other amateur athletics. Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program, including Contracts.

Taxation of Business Entities (3)   LAW-7516
A study of the federal income tax treatment of C corporations and pass-through entities such as partnerships, S corporations, and limited liability companies. The course examines on a comparative basis the formation, operation, and sales and liquidation of these entities. Corporate reorganizations and related transactions are also covered. Prerequisites: (1) One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program; (2) Federal Income Taxation.

Trademark & Unfair Competition Law (3)   LAW-7550
Using the principles of unfair competition law, this course examines the creation, maintenance, and enforcement of trademark rights, as well as related doctrines of rights of publicity, trade dress, trade secrets, and false advertising. It also includes an exploration of public policies and economy underlying trademark law. Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program. May be offered as a distance learning course. Prerequisite: 28 completed hours.

Water Law (3)   LAW-7339
This course examines the legal control of water resources, an issue of increasing concern in Texas and the nation. Topics include riparian rights, the water permit system, groundwater issues, water as a regional and shared resource, beneficial uses v. waste, underground conservation districts, and navigability. Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program, including Property.

White Collar Crime (3)   LAW-7579
An exploration of the substantive and procedural problems connected with the federal prosecution and defense of white collar crime. The course examines selected federal statutes, including the Racketeer-Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (RICO). Topics include mail and wire fraud, securities fraud, money laundering, corporate criminal liability, and grand jury investigations. Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program, including Criminal Law.

Wills and Estates Clinic (2) or (3)   LAW-7851S
Real-world experience in handling the estate planning needs of low-income clients; under the supervision of licensed attorneys, interview clients, draft documents including wills, powers of attorney, health care advance directives and other instruments; may handle probate matters. Prerequisites: One year in law school in the full-time or part-time program; Wills and Estates.

PRACTICUM COURSES

In order to implement a program that allows students to develop necessary practical lawyering skills, Texas A&M School of Law has developed practicum courses in discrete substantive areas as well as in particular skill areas. These courses involve the supervised practical application of previously studied theory. Many of the lawyering skills identified in the American Bar Association’s “MacCrate Report” will be learned in each practicum—problem solving, legal analysis and reasoning, legal research, factual investigation, communication, counseling, negotiation, litigation and alternative dispute resolution procedures, organization and management of legal work, and recognizing and resolving ethical dilemmas.

Criminal Procedure Practicum (2)   LAW-7707
This course enables students to put into practice the concepts first studied in Criminal Procedure. Students will be required to draft motions to suppress and habeas corpus petitions challenging timely topics. Prerequisites: (1) One year of law school in the fulltime or part-time program; (2) Criminal Procedure.

Guardianship Practicum (1-2)   LAW-7704
This course is designed to teach students about Texas guardianship law. It will teach how to determine if a guardianship is needed or if there are less restrictive alternatives to a guardianship and what those alternatives entail. Students will learn how to draft applications and orders for a guardianship of the person and/or estate along with all supporting documents. Students will draft inventory, appraisements, list of claims, annual accountings, reports of attorneys or guardians ad litem, and final accountings for guardianships of the estate. The course will provide a practical look at how to represent an applicant for guardianship as well as how to represent the proposed incapacitated person.. Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program.

Intellectual Property Licensing Practicum (2)   LAW-7341S
This course addresses issues raised by licensing intellectual property, including motivations for licensing, types of agreements used in licensing transactions, provisions commonly used in licensing contracts, etc. Practical scenarios will be addressed and applied in class. Grades are based on class participation and presentations, in-class exercises, role-plays and written assignments. Prerequisites: (1) One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program; (2) Intellectual Property, Copyrights, Trademark & Unfair Competition Law.

Negotiation Theory & Practice Practicum (3)   LAW-7707S
This course offers students the opportunity to further develop their negotiation skills. It will focus on simulations and negotiation exercises intended to give students firsthand experience in applying interest-based negotiation techniques. The course examines the skills, constraints, and dynamics of negotiation. Students will also learn a theoretical framework for understanding negotiation practice in a variety of contexts through readings from the fields of law, psychology, business, and communication. Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program.

Texas Criminal Law Practicum (2) or (3)   LAW-7725
Students function as prosecuting and defense attorneys, taking a hypothetical case from arrest through postconviction remedies. The course may include such topics as legal limits on criminal investigation, the grand jury process, setting bail, negotiating plea bargains, drafting pretrial motions, the discovery process, trial rights and tactics, habeas corpus, and appeals. Prerequisites: (1) One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program, including Criminal Law; (2) Criminal Procedure.

Texas Legal Research Practicum (2)   LAW-7776
This course focuses on advanced legal research methodologies, costs, and strategies within the context of Texas law. It includes coverage of the Texas court system, legislation and legislative history, regulations and regulatory history, agency decisions and websites, treatises, electronic databases, free online resources, court rules, jury instructions, practice materials, and strategies for making sure that your research is thorough. Students complete various assignments, including drafting exercises, using Texas practice materials. A final project is required. Prerequisite: One year of law school in the full-time or part-time program, including LARW I & II.

Trial Advocacy Practicum (3)   LAW-7775S
A study of civil and criminal trials, taught through lectures, demonstrations, and simulations. Each trial segment is examined separately, and accompanying exercises are conducted with students acting as attorneys and witnesses. The course culminates in a mock trial at a local courthouse, where students have the opportunity to present an entire case through verdict. Prerequisites: (1) All lockstep courses except Constitutional Law; (2) Evidence (may be taken concurrently).

SEMINAR COURSES

ADR in the Workplace Seminar (2)   LAW-7603
In this seminar, you will study workplace dispute resolution with a focus on the legal status and practical application of Alternative Dispute Resolution in the workplace. It begins with the most familiar alternative to litigation, labor arbitration. It then examines labor arbitration’s first cousin, individual employment arbitration. Then the course will shift into a discussion on mediation of employment disputes. Throughout the course, we will also review litigation of employment disputes as a necessary component of the foundation for exploring the pros and cons of using ADR versus litigation. You will have assigned background reading on all these matters and will perform simulations of arbitration and mediation of these disputes. Taking an employment-related course such as Labor Law, Employment Discrimination, or Employment Law is NOT a prerequisite. However, because the course concentrates on employment issues, you should have a strong intellectual interest in workplace dispute resolution and a desire to write about topics related to the course concentration (either a workplace topic or an ADR topic) in completing the rigorous writing requirement. Prerequisite: All lockstep courses except Constitutional Law.

Advanced Issues in Criminal Justice Seminar (2)   LAW-7616
Over ninety percent of the criminal cases in the United States are resolved before going to trial. In this two-credit seminar we will consider the most traditional form of dispute resolution in criminal cases: plea bargaining of criminal cases. The course will also look at emerging trends in the criminal justice system such as restorative justice and therapeutic courts including drug courts. This seminar will also examine issues relating to juvenile justice including alternative proceedings and the theory and policy underlying the treatment of juvenile offenders. Students and will gain a basic understanding and critically examine the various forms of criminal case resolution and the underlying policy goals. Prerequisites: (1) All lockstep courses except Constitutional Law; (2) Criminal Procedure.

Advanced Topics in Intellectual Property Seminar (2)   LAW-7628
This course provides an in-depth exploration and analysis of various issues in intellectual property law through an analysis of some of the seminal cases in IP jurisprudence. In contrast to many law school courses, which enable the study of law through excerpted portions of cases on particular topics, this course will dig beneath the surface and explore the depths of intellectual property theory and policy as they manifest in individual cases throughout history. We will not seek to canvass the area of IP, but rather explore foundational aspects of intellectual property through individual case stories, other primary and secondary resource material, and seminal law review articles. Prerequisites: All lockstep courses except Constitutional Law; (2) two Intellectual Property courses.

Advanced Topics in Property Seminar (2)   LAW-7626
This seminar will explore the concept of property, including its theoretical dimensions and its usefulness in resolving difficult legal and social problems. Some topics discussed in this class will build on introductory material traditionally covered in first-year property courses; other topics will be entirely new for most students. Class readings and discussions will focus on four or five substantive areas that will rotate from semester to semester. Among the topics that may be covered are the following: history and development of property rights; property theory; property rights in the body; housing discrimination; eminent domain and takings law; property in cyberspace; comparative property law; and land use involving religious groups. Prerequisite: All lockstep courses except Constitutional Law.

Bioethics & the Law Seminar (2)   LAW-7606
A seminar that examines the legal, ethical, and policy aspects of current issues in bioethics, including patient autonomy, the right to refuse treatment, euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide, genetics, reproductive technologies, fetal treatment and research, human experimentation, and organ transplantation. Prerequisite: All lockstep courses except Constitutional Law.

Business Law Seminar (2)   LAW-7727
A seminar exploring the various areas of business law, including areas of corporate, commercial, securities, tax, and regulatory law in both domestic and international settings. The seminar is designed to reflect the fact that complex business problems often involve the intersection of several bodies of law. Each student will be required to produce a paper on a topic of his or her choice in any area of business-related law, and will be expected to present the paper to the class and lead a discussion. We will explore the links between papers relating to very diverse areas of the law. Prerequisites: All lockstep courses except Constitutional Law; (2) Business Associations I or Business Associations (four credit-hour course offered prior to fall 2013).

Climate Change and Energy Law Seminar (2)   LAW-7644
Analysis of evolving climate change control and adaptation policies, both domestic and international; evaluation of policies intersecting with laws regulating energy development; the extent to which laws and policies incentivize technological innovation and encourage sustainable energy development. Prerequisites: All lockstep courses except Constitutional Law.

Death Penalty Seminar (2)   LAW-7615
A study of the law of capital punishment in an effort to understand the guiding legal principles and parameters of this most severe form of criminal sanction. Specific issues addressed include, among others, narrowing capital punishment to certain crimes and particular types of defendants, the role of race in the death penalty, death qualified juries, and the function of “guided discretion” in the use of the sanction. Prerequisite: All lockstep courses except Constitutional Law.

Domestic Violence Seminar (2)   LAW-7622
This course examines domestic violence in the criminal justice system and in family law. The purpose of this seminar is to expose law students to the issue of domestic violence. The goals of this course will be accomplished through text, class discussions, simulated role-play, guest speakers, videos, student presentations, and a written paper or final submitted by each student. As a requirement of the seminar, each student must observe one domestic violence trial or lengthy hearing. Prerequisites: All lockstep courses except Constitutional Law.

Gender & the Law Seminar (2)   LAW-7636
This course explores the historical, comparative, statutory, and especially constitutional dimensions of law’s regulation of sexuality and gender. Students read primarily case law, supplemented with statutory law and articles. Topics to be considered include the critiques and defenses of marriage; the legal and social implications of categories such as bisexuality, intersexuality, and transsexuality; the relationship between feminist, gay and queer politics; and the impact of sexual orientation and gender challenges on the workplace, military policy, family law, and education. Prerequisite: All lockstep courses except Constitutional Law.

The Information Society Seminar (2)   LAW-7263
This course explores complex interrelationships between technological, economic, cultural, political, and legal influences that shape the information society. As a seminar, this course will satisfy the rigorous writing requirement. Prerequisite: All lockstep courses except Constitutional Law.

Islamic Middle East Law Seminar (2)   LAW-7638
This survey course explores secular and Islamic law that serve as the basis of legal systems in various Middle Eastern nations. Students will be introduced to a critical overview of the history and practice of Islamic law, including the origins of Islamic law, the development of the classical schools of thought, and the nature of pre-modern and legal institutions. This will be done by analyzing the various methodologies that are represented in Islamic legal literature, helping to enable the students to identify modern manifestations of these methodologies in contemporary Muslim discourses. Students will then learn how Islamic law intersects with secular laws in the context of modern family law, finance, and human rights. Prerequisites: All lockstep courses except Constitutional Law.

Jurisprudence Seminar (2)   LAW-7643
An introduction to legal philosophy. The major jurisprudential issues, the definition of law, the concept of justice, the relation of law and morality, and the function of legal analysis will be considered in the light of specific legal theories, including modern American legal philosophies. Prerequisite: All lockstep courses except Constitutional Law.

Law & Literature Seminar (2)   LAW-7650
This seminar examines the nature, practice, and institutions of law as depicted in a variety of literary texts. The course also explores how techniques associated with literary criticism may be applied to selected legal texts. Prerequisite: All lockstep courses except Constitutional Law.

Law & Psychology Seminar (2)   LAW-7655
A study of the intersection between law and psychology, with particular emphasis on the application of forensic psychology in the criminal justice system. Specific issues addressed include, among other topics, the evidentiary standard governing the admissibility of scientific evidence, false confessions, eyewitness testimony, repressed memories, and sex offenders. Prerequisite: All lockstep courses except Constitutional Law.

Law and Science Seminar (2)   LAW-7639
This interdisciplinary seminar will examine the interrelation of the law with science in varying contexts including the courts, legislative and agency action, and societal norms and expectations. It will explore the impact science has on the law and how the law affects scientific research and progress. It will also consider the application of science in legal circumstances as well as the law to various scientific topics. Topics covered in the seminar may include: the role of the public, government, and private sectors in scientific development; the role of courts and the law in managing scientific information; legal and scientific standards and methodologies; risk assessment; scientific misconduct; and environmental regulations. Prerequisites: All lockstep courses except Constitutional Law.

National Security Law Seminar (2)   LAW-7627
Terrorism affects the lives of all Americans in profound ways. No subject is more dynamic or interesting. Issues involving our security are at the forefront of public debate as we strive to balance national defense with our ideals of justice and liberty. Understanding these issues is essential to the wellbeing of our nation. This course will provide the legal and political framework for national security law, war powers, the rapidly evolving topic of counterterrorism, the challenges of the intelligence community, and the protection of state secrets. Prerequisite: All lockstep courses.

Oil, Gas & Natural Resources Seminar (2)   LAW-7634
Explores natural resources law, the body of legal rules and processes that govern the ownership, human use, management, and protection of natural resources including oil and gas and other minerals, wildlife, rivers, national parks, and forests; history, politics and economics of natural resources law; practical aspects of practicing in this area; tools needed to find and understand the laws relevant to particular resources. Prerequisites: All lockstep courses except Constitutional Law.

The Politics of Supreme Court Decision Making Seminar (2)   LAW-7641
This course considers the Supreme Court as a political entity, not merely a court or decision- making body. The students are required to study individual justices, different judicial periods and courts (i.e. the Warren Court, the Burger Court, the Roberts Court) and evaluate how the political nature of decision making affects lawyers and their clients. Prerequisite: All lockstep courses.

Race & the Law Seminar (2)   LAW-7666
This seminar studies the many and various ways in which race and the American legal system interact, from both a historical and contemporary standpoint. Particular emphasis will be placed on the role the law has played in reinforcing slavery, shaping Reconstruction, and influencing the lives of various racial groups. The seminar culminates with an examination of some of the current issues surrounding the legal treatment of race, including reparations and affirmative action. Prerequisite: All lockstep courses except Constitutional Law.

Sentencing Law and Policy Seminar (2)   LAW-7646
The sentencing phase of an offender's contact with the criminal justice system; exploration of the dynamics of the creation, use and impact of sentencing law and policy through the experiences of the key stakeholders at the state and federal level. Prerequisites: All lockstep courses except ​Constitutional law.

Special Topics in Negotiation Seminar (2)   LAW-7631
This seminar will explore a series of topics involved in the theories, strategies, and techniques of effective negotiation. Students will submit a research paper that meets the upper-level rigorous writing requirement. In addition to traditional lecture and class discussion, students will engage in simulations and exercises to learn the material. Topics for the research papers may include (but are not limited to): avoiding being exploited, utilizing competitive negotiation moves, increasing collaboration, biases and cognitive illusions, emotions during the negotiation, principles of influence and persuasion, power in negotiation, culture and gender in negotiation, ethical considerations, and critiques of settlement advocacy. Prerequisites: All lockstep courses except Constitutional Law.

Supreme Court Seminar (2)   LAW-7675
A seminar in which students act as U.S. Supreme Court members, reading briefs in selected cases presently before the Supreme Court, discussing the cases, and writing opinions deciding the cases. Prerequisites: (1) All lockstep courses; (2) Constitutional Law (may be taken concurrently).

Texas Search & Seizure Seminar (2)   LAW-7676
This seminar examines the issues raised in the Fourth Amendment and the Texas Constitution, Article 1 Section 9. Topics include the expectation of privacy, probable cause, search and arrest warrants, warrantless action, the exclusionary rule, Terry stops, and post-9/11 considerations. The seminar includes student participation in a practical application of the law of search and seizure. Prerequisites: (1) All lockstep courses except Constitutional Law; (2) Criminal Procedure (may be taken concurrently).

 

COMPETITIONS

Students may earn credit for their participation in Mock Trial, Moot Court, and Alternative Dispute Resolution Competitions.

JOURNALS

Students may earn credit for their participation on Law Review and the Journal of Property Law.

TEACHING ASSISTANTS

Students may earn credit for their service as Teaching Assistants.